Hullverson Law Firm

Brain Injury Archives

TBIs: causes, symptoms and treatment

Some people in Missouri might wonder what causes a traumatic brain injury and how it is treated. A TBI happens because of a blow to the head or because the head is jolted in a way that shakes the brain inside the skull. People often get TBIs from falls, motor vehicle accidents, playing contact sports or combat injuries.

Brain injury patients at risk for developing PTSD

Missouri residents who have suffered a mild brain injury in the past may be interested to learn that, according to a study, they may be at an increased risk for suffering post-traumatic stress disorder. However, knowing that mild head trauma could lead to PTSD means that getting more timely treatment may be possible.

Costs of sports concussion injuries worry insurance companies

Participants in professional and amateur sports in Missouri often expose themselves to the risk of concussion injuries. Lawsuits against the National Football League have revealed the long-term brain damage that can result from repeated blows to the head during contact sports. A report from S&P Global Ratings identified a rise in insurance claims for sports-related brain injuries, and insurance companies have taken notice. The report explained that insurance companies have begun writing exclusion clauses into their policies that would limit payouts for brain trauma that results from sports. These clauses could specifically apply to policies written for athletic organizations, schools, helmet manufacturers and sports teams.

Experimental drug may improve memory in TBI patients

There are many people in Missouri who are living with the effects of a traumatic brain injury. The brain trauma that causes a TBI is often sustained while playing contact sports. There has been a lot of media coverage about the consequences of head trauma for professional football players.

The link between traumatic brain injuries and depression

Missouri residents may be unaware that most scientific research into mental illness has found that individuals who suffer serious head injuries have a far higher risk of developing depression. The general scientific consensus is that the risk of depression is between two and five times higher for traumatic brain injury sufferers compared to the population as a whole.

Investigation finds NFL tried to influence brain injury research

Missouri residents may be aware of a report issued by New Jersey Rep. Frank Pallone that finds that the National Football League improperly tried to influence a National Institutes of Health study on the connection between football and brain injuries. According to the senior House Democrat's investigation, the NFL rescinded a $30 million donation to the NIH when it would not take $16 million of the donation away from Robert Stern, a Boston University researcher and expert on the relationship between football and brain injury.

Study of retired NFL players finds brain damage

Most Missouri football fans know that the NFL has come under fire in recent years as more and more research uncovers a link between playing the game and developing the serious progressive brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. There are no tests that can be done to detect CTE among the living, and the link only began to emerge when pathologists started to look for the condition during autopsies carried out on deceased former players. While the league is now starting to accept the growing body of scientific evidence, a study of 40 retired NFL players indicates that the problem may be far more widespread than even the direst of previous predictions.

The use of eye tracking to diagnose a concussion

A Missouri football player might want to get back into a game quickly after a minor head injury. However, the protocols for dealing with concussions can interfere with this desire. A new technology for tracking eye movement could provide prompt feedback about concussions in such a situation, allowing players to resume action more quickly if everything appears to be fine.

New research on TBIs

Many Missouri residents are some of the estimated 1.7 million Americans who incur traumatic brain injuries each year. TBIs can destroy their quality of life and leave them unable to meet their basic daily needs. Their may be lasting effects that persist for years after the injury is incurred. Researchers have been working to detect the exact way in which TBIs cause this long-term impairment, as understanding the syndrome may prove helpful in developing new methods of treatment.

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